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Energy Democracy Media Roundup – week of April 25, 2016

This week in Energy Democracy:

The story of a Microgrid in Brooklyn, learning how ComEdison took aim at a solar power law in Chicago, and, finally, another week, another set of ballot initiatives on the solar energy debate.

Featured Stories:

Sharply higher rooftop solar potential increases potential for energy self-reliance by John Farrell, CleanTechnica

Instead of Lobbying, Top 25 Utilities Could Have Doubled U.S. Solar Capacity

placeholderThe Investor Responsibility Research Center Institute just released a report analyzing the top 25 U.S.

Talk Up Solar Energy Where You Live!

Whether you live in a single-family residence or a multi-family community, there is probably a great opportunity to take advantage of sunlight that falls on your roof to generate clean local electricity!

For example, if you live in a single-family home in North Texas, check out Go Solar at Home to learn about rooftop solar, do a little homework, and if you are interested, enroll to obtain quotes from local solar installation companies.

Energy Democracy Media Roundup – week of April 11, 2016

This week in Energy Democracy:

We get the details on the policies blocking Microgrids implementation, learn about how Massachusetts raises their net metering cap but lowers reimbursement rate, and how we have the power for 100% renewable energy.

Featured

Sharply higher rooftop solar potential increases potential for energy self-reliance by John Farrell, CleanTechnica

Sharply Higher Rooftop Solar Potential Increases Opportunity for Energy Self-Reliance

placeholderEarlier this year, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory released a new estimate of rooftop solar potential, an update to 2008 figures we used in our landmark state-by-state energy atlas, Energy Self-Relian

Freeing Electric Cooperatives from Fossil Fuel Serfdom? – Episode 33 of Local Energy Rules Podcast

Electric cooperatives arose from New Deal legislation that provided government-backed low-interest loans to bring electricity to rural areas that for-profit companies wouldn’t serve in the 1930s. They were engines of the rural economy. But today they face unique challenges, including a disproportionate reliance on coal-fired power, often purchased on decades-long contracts.

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